About the K-13 Continuum

Consume, Create, Connect: A K-13 Continuum in Participatory Literacies


Convergence Academies at Columbia College, working in partnership with Chicago Public Schools, recognizes that many teachers and educational leaders are eager to harness the power of networked collaboration and participatory media as a way to bring greater meaning, relevance and agency to the student academic experience. The K-13 Continuum is being designed as an interactive framework that aims to help prepare teachers and students to become full and active participants in the new digital and networked culture.


We use the term participatory literacies to refer to the set of competencies that enable young people to develop communication skills, social and cultural capital, civic agency and learning dispositions necessary for full participation in a globally networked world. Classroom teachers will draw on the 3Cs framework that serves as the foundation of the Curriculum Continuum, along with the 6 Pillars of Participatory Practices (Choice of Expression, Collaboration, Authentic Participation, Critical Response, Iterative Learning and Play) in order to build strong learning communities which include safe spaces for creation, sharing, mentorship, instant feedback, and collective knowledge building.


Participatory learning practices can be identified when communities of learners work together to develop conventional academic knowledge alongside newer networked knowledge. These participatory learning practices align to 21st Century standards, ISTE standards, Common Core State Standards and National Core Media Arts Standards.

The framework also helps cultivate Connected Learning design principles into schools by identifying processes and practices that are production centered, openly networked and organized around a shared purpose. The purpose of the K-13 Continuum in Participatory Literacies is to provide teachers with a practical pedagogical tool, replete with multimedia examples drawn directly from implemented classroom lessons, across all grade levels and disciplines, including Freshman year of college.



Consume, Create, Connect: A K-13 Continuum in Participatory Literacies



Create Practices

K-2

3-5

6-8

9-10

11-12

13 (College Freshman)

Build (Networked) Communities














Produce Media & Stories














Design/Invent/Make








Connect Practices

K-2

3-5

6-8

9-10

11-12

13 (College Freshman)

Connect within Groups














Network beyond Groups














Curate/Organize/

Mobilize








Consume Practices

K-2

3-5

6-8

9-10

11-12

13 (College Freshman)

Inquire/Search/Discover














Play and Tinker














Read/Engage/Remix












Six Pillars of Convergence



6 Pillars of Connected Learning


Behaviors, dispositions, and habits of mind that young people embrace as they participate in their world


Authentic Participation

Relevance and meaning beyond the classroom

  • Students create and share work in order to have an actual impact within their community.

  • Students engage in conversations with people beyond the classroom walls (in person or via social media), including community leaders, experts, etc.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.4; CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.4; MATH.PRACTICE.MP4


Choice of Expression

Ownership over how we learn and communicate

  • Students explore a big idea through a variety of texts that cross media and genre, based on interest.

  • Students develop their own process for approaching and solving problems.

  • Students decide how to communicate based on their abilities and the purpose of their work.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.SL.2; CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.8; MATH.PRACTICE.MP8


Collaboration

Interdependence, division of labor, skill-sharing, and divergent thinking


Critical Response

Analysis, interpretation, and response to media messages


Iterative Learning

Valuing feedback and revision of our ideas to improve our work

  • Students have ample time and opportunities in their design/ creative processes to go through multiple drafts or revisions.

  • Students give and collect feedback meant to progress work towards the “next level."

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.5; MATH.PRACTICE.MP1


Play

Constructing knowledge through experimentation, exploration, and figuring things out

  • Students learn how to use materials and tools by playing around with them (rather than direct instruction or a step-by-step tutorial).

  • Students try out ideas and roles through experimentation, both within and without constraints.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.CCRA.W.10; MATH.PRACTICE.MP5



6 Pillars of Connected Teaching

Guiding principles that educators can harness to build a culture of student-centered learning in school


Authentic Participation

Relevance and meaning beyond the classroom

  • Teachers design learning experiences that have real-world impact beyond the classroom.

  • Teachers situate learning outcomes and activities authentically within a larger project or context.

  • REACH 1b: Knowledge of Students (Interests and Cultural Heritage); 3c: Engaging Students in Learning


Choice of Expression

Ownership over how we learn and communicate

  • Teachers find and curate a variety of texts and models that cross media and genre.

  • Teachers challenge students to develop their own processes for approaching and solving problems.

  • Teacher scaffold students to use different types of media to communicate their ideas for different purposes and audiences.

  • REACH 1d: Designing Coherent Instruction (Variety of Complex Texts); 2b: Establishing a Culture of Learning (Student Ownership of Learning)


Collaboration

Interdependence, division of labor, skill-sharing, and divergent thinking

  • Teachers provide structured roles, expectations, and protocols to scaffold collaboration.

  • Teachers create and manage opportunities for collaboration, both in class and through networked communities (e.g. social media)

  • REACH 2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport (Student Interactions with Each Other); 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques


Critical Response

Analysis, interpretation, and response to media messages

  • Teachers take advantage of student interest in pop culture and social media, challenging students to be critical about what they consume in and out of the classroom.

  • Teachers design experiences for students to “talk back" to media through comments, social media campaigns, and remixing.

  • REACH 1a: a. Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy, 3b: Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques


Iterative Learning

Valuing feedback and revision of our ideas to improve our work

  • Teachers design projects with time for students to go through multiple drafts or revisions within the design process, based on feedback.

  • Teachers use documentation to share and reflect on practice with colleagues and make adjustments based on feedback.

  • REACH 3d: Using Assessment in Instruction; 3e: Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness, 4a: Reflecting on Teaching and Learning


Play

Opportunity and permission to experiment and figure things out

  • Teachers allow students to learn how to use materials and tools by playing around with them (rather than direct instruction or a step-by-step tutorial).

  • Teachers intentionally design constraints for students to work within, based on learning goals.

  • REACH 3c: Engaging Students in Learning; 2d: Managing Student Behavior (Fostering Positive Student Behavior); 1d: Designing Coherent Instruction